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2016: A Year of Digital Development in Action

In 2016, mSTAR implemented 41 activities.

It was a year of dedicated work towards mSTAR’s goal of using technology to improve lives in underserved communities.

Read our 2016 Annual Report.

Our 2016 activities spanned Central America, Asia, and Africa. They included  diverse activities such as the Innovations Awards for original uses of data for resilience; a widely-received report on alternative business models for connectivity; and a Financial Inclusion Forum highlighting Bill Gates. All 41 activities were exciting and meaningful; here are our most noteworthy:

First of its kind digitally-enabled micro-credit in Bangladesh.
One of the biggest challenges farmers face in Bangladesh is that they pay back loans weekly. Paying loans so regularly can cause a snowball effect of debt for farmers who, due to the nature of farming, don’t have a steady weekly income. Once crops are in the ground, it may be a few months before they have income. To pay back the original loan farmers are often forced to “take out other loans…and rush to sell their crops immediately after harvest,” Josh Woodard, mSTAR Regional ICT and Digital Finance Specialist, has said. Rushing to sell  crops means farmers often don’t get their full market value. To address this, mSTAR has worked with two different banks in Bangladesh, Bank Asia and IFIC Bank Limited, to launch two new digitally-enabled micro-credit products for farmers; the first using NFC-enabled debit cards, the latter using mobile wallets. Both of these products have much lower interest rates than alternative options offered by microfinance institutions, as well as much more attractive repayment terms—a single repayment after six months, instead of weekly installments. With these products, farmers can now pay after harvest. No longer in a rush to see their produce, they are more likely to receive a better price. In a country where most people work in agriculture, these new products could be critical to stemming poverty and breaking a cycle of debt. Over 250 farmers have signed up for the initial pilots of these two products, and both banks are already eyeing expansion to thousands of more farmers.

Mobile money salary payments for teachers in Liberia.
Through mobile money, mSTAR is transforming the daily lives of teachers in rural areas. In 2016, mSTAR successfully rolled out mobile salary payments for teachers in Nimba County. Sixty-seven teachers received payments in the first mobile payment payroll. 100 percent reported saving time compared to traditional direct deposit. Mobile salary payments also helped teachers save money. Before, teachers reported spending approximately 13.5 hours and $25 of their salary to pick up their money. After mobile payments, they spent an average of 25 minutes and $2 in service fees to cash out their mobile money. The success of the rollout has resulted in buy-ins to roll out mobile money to health workers and to teachers nationwide.

Addressing the data gap in mobile phone users.
mSTAR, USAID/Mozambique and DFID, through DAI’s Financial Sector Deepening project, set out to clearly understand the landscape of growing mobile phone users. mSTAR and partners interviewed over 6,000 mobile phone users and non-users. The survey garnered valuable information and data about the availability and accessibility of mobile technologies and the way people use mobile phones in their daily lives. The findings will allow USAID staff in Mozambique to make smarter programming decisions as they increasingly rely on digital technologies to deliver better results.

In 2016, mSTAR used technology for better development outcomes across sectors. We encouraged innovative uses of data for resilience and rolled out mobile money products that show real promise in improving daily lives and diminishing the threat of poverty. In 2016, we continued to establish digital technologies as some of the most exciting and promising avenues to improving lives among the most vulnerable throughout the world.

Review our 2016 Annual Report (with pictures!) here. 

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Call for Case Studies! Responsible Data Practices in Digital Development

Do you have a digital technology project that manages personally identifiable or otherwise protected/sensitive data on beneficiaries in the field?

Have you struggled with and addressed challenges around balancing the need for information, protecting it from misuse, and mitigating privacy risks?

Would you like to engage with and inform USAID on development of best practices for ethical data collection, use, and management in field-based programs?

We want to hear from you!

mSTAR is looking for up to three projects where we can test and apply our draft good practice guidelines for ethical collection, use, management, sharing and release of data in field-based digital development programs.

The use of digital technologies is increasing in development programs. This has the potential to yield tremendous benefits but also increases the chances of exposing individuals and communities to harms and privacy risks related to poorly managed and protected data. USAID and its implementing partners recognize these challenges, especially the need for good practices to guide collection, use and sharing of data in a responsible manner.

Therefore, in collaboration with Sonjara, Inc., Georgetown University and the USAID Global Development Lab, mSTAR is conducting research on existing practices, policies, systems, and legal frameworks through which international development data is collected, used, shared, and released. Based on this research, the team will develop good practice guidelines for USAID that will be tested against real world experiences in field-based digital development programs and that will help:

  • Mitigate privacy and security risks for beneficiaries and others
  • Improve performance and development outcomes through use of data
  • Promote transparency, accountability and public good through open data

mSTAR is looking for digital development projects to assess how our guidelines would work in real world settings. Once selected, the research team will conduct field visits of 1-2 weeks per project, in order to understand “on-the-ground” context and project needs. The research team will work with the project management team to apply draft practice guidelines to each case, help identify what practices work and any gaps in the guidelines. The team will also capture feedback from the project management team and partners on implications for project costs and timelines, as well as document existing good practices and lessons learned from the project on how they manage their data. These findings will be used to further refine the USAID Responsible Data Practice guidelines.

What types of projects are we looking for?

  • Ongoing or recently concluded projects that are using digital technologies (SMS, IVR, mobile based data collection, USSD, software, social media platforms, sensors/IoT, etc.) to collect, store, analyze, manage, use and share individuals’ data.
  • The data could include personally identifiable information (PII) and/or other personal information such as health records of pregnant mothers, teachers’ attendance, financial transaction history of individuals, HIV/TB status, and/or other potentially sensitive information like LGBTQI status, membership in vulnerable groups (disability, ethic/tribal minority etc.), geocoded information, etc.
  • The project should have informal or formal processes for privacy/security risk assessment and mitigation especially with respect to field implementation of digital technologies (listed above) as part of their program. These may be implicit or explicit (i.e. documented or written). They potentially include formal review processes conducted by ethics review boards or institutional review boards (IRBs) for projects. Submissions of cases are NOT limited to only projects that have conducted formal ethics review. Projects that have been clearly defined as “research,” however, are excluded from this analysis. Note that, while information security processes are highly relevant to the overall problem of mitigating privacy risks, we are NOT looking for case studies that are entirely about information security/cybersecurity practices.
  • All sectors of international development are welcome to submit case studies. We are looking for diversity in context and programming.
  • Projects from all geographical regions are welcome.
  • We prefer case studies from USAID-funded projects but are open to receiving case studies from other donor-supported projects.

If your project or activity falls under the above criteria, please take a few minutes to share your project information here. We welcome multiple submissions from one organization; simply reuse this form for each case study proposed.

Contributions must be received by March 1, 2017.

Your help and support are much appreciated! Please share this call with others who may be interested in contributing case studies.

Click here to submit your case study. 

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The First Step in Developing Effective Mobile Programs: Understanding the Landscape

Over the last decade, Mozambique has witnessed a transformative time in communications and mobile technology.

In 2005, with 1.5 million mobile subscriptions, mobile phone use had already far outpaced landline connections. By 2015, subscriptions had skyrocketed to 20 million. This transformation in connectivity marks a fundamental shift in how people, government and businesses communicate with one another across the country. As increasing numbers access mobile services across Mozambique, private and public actors alike are recognizing opportunities to apply mobile technology to accelerate development outcomes.

While this is an exciting time to leverage new possibilities and integrate mobile technology within programming, those seeking to design mobile programs or new products are often faced with a profound dearth of data on who is using mobiles and how. This is a particular challenge for the development and humanitarian communities who often work with some of the most vulnerable populations. Statistics available through industry and trade groups are often outdated and mask critically important differences in access. There are also few statistics captured on usage, yet we know that understanding the mobile features and services users are comfortable with, as well as unique borrowing patterns, are critical for ensuring success. Without better data on ICT access and usage among these key populations, designing effective and efficient programs that successfully take advantage of mobile technology has remained a challenge.

mSTAR set out to address this data gap in Mozambique with the unique Mobile Access and Usage Study (MAUS). Proving that donors are in agreement on the need for data on technology, USAID/Mozambique and DFID, through DAI’s Financial Sector Deepening project, partnered to commission the study. This multi-faceted study examined the availability and accessibility of mobile technologies, and the dynamic ways they are being used in the daily lives of Mozambicans.

mausobjectivesThe MAUS household survey employed traditional face-to-face interviews on access, usage and barriers with adults across four provinces: Manica, Nampula, Tete and Zambezia. The study also included a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) survey utilizing remote data-collection via mobiles. The CATI was designed to not only gather a more complete understanding of how active mobile users are using their phones, but also to measure change in that use over time, and to test methods for retaining participants in mobile phone surveys.

mSTAR recently completed the study and hosted a presentation in Maputo, Mozambique to provide a first view of the findings with our many collaborators. The opening and closing remarks featured John Irons, USAID’s  Agriculture, Trade and Business Office Chief, Shahnila Azher, Team Leader of DFID’s Growth and Rural Development and Dr. Americo Muchanga, National Director of the Instituto Nacional das Comunicações de Moçambique (INCM). The coordination and collaboration achieved in working with the mobile operators, government agencies, and donor groups is a testament to the importance of this activity, as well as the shared value in understanding the mobile landscape in Mozambique.

Combined, the surveys completed over 6,000 interviews with both users and non-users in the four target provinces. As presented in Maputo, the study surfaced unique mobile landscapes for each target province and significant variations in access across geographies, gender and education.

Check back to this blog soon to get the full report and additional analysis!

In the meantime, this infographic presents the highlights of the survey results to date. It is hoped that the results of the study will help drive the deliberate and responsible use of technology in development.

Project NOAH won the Impact Demonstration award and mClinica won the Early Stage Innovations award at the Data for Resilience Summit.

Innovative Uses of Data Prepare Communities for Climate Change and Improve Resilience

By Josh Woodard

Data and resilience are two of the biggest buzz words in development right now.

Chatter is growing in the development sector about the potential ways digital data can be opened, shared and analyzed to transform decision making and accelerate development outcomes.

At the same time, there is an increased focus on the value of resilience, which manifests itself in the ability of individuals, communities and countries to respond and adapt to shocks and stresses.

Like all buzz words, data and resilience run the risk of being frequently talked about but infrequently put into action. The fact is that if we can cut through the hype and engage in complex but necessary dialogue and partnership, digital data has the potential to enhance resilience capacities.

It was against this backdrop that USAID and FHI 360 organized a two-day Harnessing the Data Revolution for Resilience Summit in Bangkok, Thailand. The Summit drew more than 90 participants with an interest in driving forward the state of data for resilience. Participants included entrepreneurs, innovators, development organizations, technology providers, donors and governments.

You brought innovators and leaders together from two different worlds – those working to strengthen the capacity of governments, NGOs and communities for development and resilience, and those who are pushing the boundaries in using new tools, technologies, and data to solve the complex problems that threaten sustainable development and erode resilience.” – Summit attendee

Leading up to the Summit, we launched the Harnessing the Data Revolution for Resilience Recognition Award to highlight case studies and new approaches using data and technology to build resilience at the individual, community, national and regional level. The award received close to 70 applications for two categories: Impact Demonstration and Early Stage Innovation. The top five finalists from each category were invited to Bangkok to make their pitch, and Summit attendees selected the winners via popular vote.

When all votes were counted, Project NOAH won the Impact Demonstration award for using data and real-time visualizations to mitigate the impact of natural disasters in the Philippines. mClinica was awarded the Early Stage Innovations award for their SnapData platform, which provides real-time monitoring tools that help governments, NGOs, and private sector companies better manage healthcare systems.

Over the course of the two days, participants heard how people are using of data to increase resilience with various levels of complexity and success. Promising examples from India, Indonesia, the Philippines and elsewhere showed how data is empowering citizens and governments to make informed decisions that are contributing to improved resilience.

We explored the next generation of technologies including sensors, machine learning, and the Internet of Things. These innovations have the potential to open up new depths of our understanding of the world around us. In addition, we heard how both new and old forms of connectivity, such as TV white space, may open up the bandwidth required to move massive amounts of data required to extend the benefits of these technologies all the way down to the base of the pyramid.

“The Summit was so exciting because we got to learn from each other and brainstorm together during the breaks on opportunities for collaboration.” – Summit attendee

None of the innovations discussed at the Summit will be possible without breaking down silos between the development sector, governments and innovators. At the Summit, we heard from several organizations in the process of doing just that. While each of them had slightly different partnership models, there were common threads: the need to invest significantly in consensus building, promote transparency between partners, and deeply understand necessities and concerns. None of these ideas are revolutionary, but they take effort and are easy to forget when faced with other competing demands during implementation.

The Summit provided participants an opportunity to dive deep into how data is being used to enhance efforts around environmental resilience, disaster risk management, planning and governance, reducing poverty, and urban resilience. Participants divided into groups to explore the challenges that they face in effectively making use of data in each of these areas. They shared promising examples and brainstormed around actions that can be taken to further accelerate uptake. As one participant said of the group discussions:

“In the many years I’ve been working as a development practitioner on these issues, I’ve never before been in a room with the types of innovators you convened. I left the Summit with new partners, new ideas, and fantastic models for how we can use and leverage data and new technologies to enhance our work.”

While it would be hyperbolic to claim that we were able to come anywhere near unlocking the data dividend for resilience in just two days, for many of those present, the Summit represented the beginning of that path. Through the combination of interactive sessions and ample networking opportunities, we hope to have sowed the seeds for future action at this intersection of these two emerging fields of data and resilience.

For those wanting to learn more, the participant list, speaker bios, presentations, and other resources from the Summit are accessible online at: https://sites.google.com/site/dataforresiliencesummit/summit-materials.

Josh Woodard serves as a technical advisor for the mSTAR project, where he oversees technical quality and provides technical direction to several activities in Asia focused on digital development, including digital financial services. He also led mSTAR’s efforts to organize and facilitate the Data for Resilience Summit.

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